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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
. we've been talking on this show the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya yan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recom
, the muslim brotherhood in egypt, to leverage that possibility. israel. israel has been watching for the last six to nine months hamas bringing in longer and longer range missiles from iran. i think they saw this as an opportunity of necessity to take those out, missiles that can now hit tel aviv and jerusalem. egypt. this is a real problem for egypt. you have a new government there that needs money from the united states. they don't want to be caught in a struggle between israel and the palestinians. for iran, this is a godsend. it takes world attention off their nuclear program and puts pressure on all the more moderate forces in the arab world, puts them at the head. and lastly, syria, couldn't be a better day for bashar al assad. takes all the attention officer ya. no one is looking at the murderous campaign of assad against his own people. >> andrea mitchell, the diplomacy for president obama about to start a second term with all of the problems in the middle east. he's in bangkok this morning. he talked about his support for israel. >> there's no country on earth that would tolerate mis
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
until 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight to buy that $2 ticket. >>> and overseas now to egypt, where opposition to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of t
funds. he says he is willing to begin peace negotiations. >> egypt's parliament, dominated by conservative muslims approved a new constitution early this morning. the assembly's more moderate members are crying foul. it is sparking another day of protests against president mohamed morsi. morsi's supporters plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on
but egypt and possibly beyond. jenna: let's focus on syria. this conflict has been going on for 19 months. woe just heard news that the opposition group there elected a leader, a christian, the second-in-command being a member of the muslim brotherhood. we keep hearing that the opposition forces are very amorphous, we can't side with them because they don't know who they are. how do we interrupt the forces if they are keith a network and are at work in this region? >> jenna, very interesting we moved from we don't know who they are to we very well know who they are at this time. the central force and opposition is the muslim brotherhood. there is consensus among the region and observe. >> the number two of the new group, is a number two of the muslim brotherhood in syria. the chief, the new president of the council is indeed a christian. he is secular. he has been very liberal. he will oppose the muslim brotherhood. the problem, jenna, he doesn't have influence. those who control the ground are islamist militias. those who control most of the institutions are muslim brotherhood. you have
to egypt hoping the leaders can solve the mess. >> the egyptian have an interest in the region not exploding. they will have to take serious steps to make it clear to hamas they will lose support. >> egypt watch what you do and how you do it. you are teetering with the congress of having aid cut off if you continue to incite violence. >> brian: what about the arab democracy? our next guest is a former cia agent with the unit. michael, another conflict between the israelis and palestinians. and the center piece is gaza. what is different now? >> what is different now, america had invested in 50 years in tyranny to make sure israel was suppressed and the america protected. when arab spring came. people including senator graham predicted just a secular democracy and it was a arab spring of secularism. people will turn in a time of turmoil to their faith or what they believed in for a thousand years. we have governments in libya where our people were killed and now in egypt that are going to support their breathern. >> brian: what is the best conclusion and best way to end. >> i am
of the next 10 years. judith came across one day this thing called the egypt influence network, a depiction around the time that mubarak fell. and if you google it, it is this blog of blue, red and purple circles. the blue are people treating in english. the red people in arabic, those in both languages come in the google executive is right in the heart of this. so having become one of the state department's more avid twitter is, i do fair number of followers including the middle east that if you look at the map, i was often the fringe. i was on the map, but not really in the middle of the conversation. that is the challenge is the technology does provide the opportunity to get in the middle of a conversation and probably the good news is the evolution from which happened under judas watched of the center for strategic counterterrorism communication, with a purposely go in and insert themselves into extreme chat rooms to generate a debate and to try to change, for lack of a better term, hearts and minds, or engage in the competition judith was talking about. so there is an opportunity here,
of people. meanwhile, egypt and president hoe ma'am head morsi says discussions are under way in cairo and arab league foreign ministers will visit on tuesday. >>> after a marathon stay in space, williams handed over command of the international space station yesterday after the calling it home for the last four months. she landed in kazakhstan tonight along with astronauts from japan and russia. president barack obama monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. is working with all parties to end violence. he made history becoming the first u.s. president to visit myanmar. the president wraps up his three-nation asian tour with a stop in cambodia. >>> state department updating hugh it deploys security for diplomatic facilities around the globe now. secretary of state hillary clinton and the defense department will monitor where forces are deployed so they can travel to help during emergencies, if needed. the change comes amid congressional hearings over how the obama administration handled security crisis in benghazi, libya
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
in egypt today after the new controversial constitution criticizes the power grab by president mohammed morsi is approved. he's expected to sign the document saturday but not the end of the conflict. the egyptian constitution needs to be approved by citizens many of whom are still angry at the moressy government. >>> nasa said it has found large deposits of ice on mercury. some areas of mercury can reach 800 degrees fahrenheit, some areas are completely shielded from the sun allowing the ice to form. nasa plans to send its messenger spacecraft to that area for a closer look in the coming months. >>> groundbreaking therapy is under way to help patients who suffer from posttramatic stress disorder. what's revolutionary about the work is the use of an illegal drug commonly referred to as ecstasy, our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta has had exclusive access to the patients and their sessions. here's his report -- >> some part of you is on guard. it just wouldn't stop. i couldn't shut it down. >> reporter: for rachel hope, the mental agony began in childhood when she says she wa
. the officer says many of his colleagues do similar acts routinely. >>> to egypt now. protesters again today filled cairo's tahrir square. they're angry over what they see as the new egyptian president's power grab, that anger intensifying now. after a mostly islamist assembly rushed to pass a draft constitution early this morning. the document will be presented to president mohamed morsi tomorrow for his signature. egyptians will vote on the draft in two weeks. >>> wow. in syria, as the internet goes dark, a is the u.s. closer to arming the rebels and is time out for bashar al assad? jim clancy is next. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with af
there in the middle east. you've got syria, the iranian nuclear thing, the constitutional struggle with an egypt. you potentially have jordan getting in the mix. plus you've now got the oldest of the issues, the israel israeli/palestinian issue. this is facing barack obama at a time he wants to do more in asia, deal with the fiscal cliff. welcome to your second term. >> a lot to do. richard haa ss. >> how did jerry adams do it? how did the irish terrorists as they were called before the peace deal, how did they not only enforce the peace but then turn to their own bad elements and say, step out of line, and we're going to crush you. >> one was, they couldn't shoot their way to power. tony blair, the irish prime minister gave them a political path that was legitimate. there was a potential there for compromise. they had discipline in their own ranks. >> how did they do that? how would hamas discipline the extremists? >> at some point -- listen, in the history of every opposition movement, there's a time when there's a civil war where people who want to compromise have to deal with the radicals who don
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)